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The Foreclosure Forecast for Investors: Mostly Cloudy

house imageTis the season for . . . mixed news on the foreclosure front, with implications for new investors planning to launch a career in income property investment in the New Year. Since the housing meltdown of 2008, foreclosures have been a staple of the housing market, offering a variety of low cost properties that heroic investors following Jason Hartman’s guidelines could use to get started building income streams for retirement or other reasons. But recent reports from the foreclosure front point to a meddled picture of the state of the housing market in this holiday season.

This piece of the foreclosure puzzle falls into a mix of apparently contradictory statistics. According to a recent RealtyTrac report, by mid-December 2012, foreclosure starts had dropped to a 71-month low. Housing experts take this to suggest that the worst days of the housing collapse are now over.

Why the drop? These numbers refer only to foreclosure starts, not to cases already in the system. One reason lies with tighter standards imposed by mortgage lenders and better oversight of the lending process in the wake of the “robosigning” scandal and other abuses by the mortgage industry. Because of these stricter standards, fewer mortgage applications are being processed, and those that are processed are more likely to represent stronger candidates for successfully paying off the loan.

Another cause for the drop in foreclosures also has to do with the aftermath of the housing crisis and the subsequent revamping of some aspects of the mortgage loan industry. Major banks implicated in the robosigning issue are now offering a variety of homeowner relief programs to help struggling mortgage holders to stay afloat and resolve issues with debt before coming to foreclosure. Refinancing programs and payment suspensions for situations such as natural disasters are designed to offer relief to homeowners trying to avoid foreclosure.

One of these is the holiday stay on foreclosure proceedings and evictions. Hoping to show a kinder, gentler side, the Federal lending agencies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, as well as many of the national and local banks that service their loans, have chosen to suspend foreclosure proceedings and evictions on completed foreclosures for the two weeks around Christmas and New Year’s Day. This move is intended to give a “break” for the holidays to homeowners who can now spend their holiday dreading eviction, rather than actually being evicted.

Whatever the intentions behind this move, the result for the housing market is a slowdown of foreclosures going up for sale now, with a projected pickup in the early months of 2013. After January 3rd, when the mortgage holiday stay ends, these cases already in process join a backlog of foreclosures from the first waves of the crisis that are moving to end game: eviction and repossession of the house by the lender. Although some of these homes, with mortgages held by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, may be sold in bulk lots to large investment companies, most will enter the market as individual listings available for purchase by home buyers looking for a permanent residence, or by individual investors.

The ghosts of housing crises past haunt the housing market this season, creating a confusing picture of the real estate landscape for investors and homeowners alike. But for heroic investors working with Jason Hartman’s strategies for creating wealth from income property, the combination of low interest rates and low-cost properties hitting the market after the holidays may still make 2013 a good year for investing. (Top image: Flickr/kiusun)

 

The Heroic Investing Team

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